Favorite Links

  • Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing: Sponsored by Stanford University, this has fun videos of how stuff is made.
  • Annals of Improbable Research: The folks who brought us the Ig–Nobel Prize also have a journal — devoted to research "which cannot and should not be reproduced."
  • Bad Science Website: Devoted to correcting common misperceptions about science. By the way, the "Coriolis Effect" does NOT have any impact upon which way the toilet flushes! (See my article "The Spin Down Under" in the "Portfolio/Newspaper" section of my website)
  • EurekaAlert: Breaking news from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, publishers of the peer-reviewed journal Science, and host to the yearly AAAS meeting.
  • Free Medical Journals Site: The title says it all.
  • How Stuff Works: Quick, entertaining, pithy.
  • National Academies of Science: Good source for non–partisan, thorough research.
  • Nobel e-museum: Everything you ever wanted to know about the Nobel, and more.
  • PubMed: A service of the National Library of Medicine, this site provides access to over 12 million MEDLINE citations back to the mid-1960's and additional life science journals. PubMed includes links to many sites providing full text articles and other related resources.
  • Real Climate: The latest scoop on global warming, from the folks who actually go out in the field and do the research — including data from coral growth, ice caps, aerial samples, satellite photos, tree rings and more. Highly recommended from a climatologist friend.
  • Science News Online: One of the best compendiums of the latest science news this week.
  • The Naked Scientists: An award–winning radio program featuring science "stripped down to its bare essentials," courtesy of some bright young things at Cambridge University and the BBC.
  • U.S. Patent Office: Who patented what, where and when, in the USA.
  • American Society of Journalists and Authors: Wonderful place to talk shop. And the annual meetings are fantastic.
  • BBC News Online: The world’s news, in 43 languages, with overseas bureaus everywhere.
  • Center for Public Integrity: Good, old–fashioned muckraking that "afflicts the comfortable and comforts the afflicted."
  • Columbia Journalism Review: “America’s premier media monitor.”
  • Folio Magazine: Trends in the magazine publishing industry, and more.
  • Google Zeitgeist: Just what are the most popular things that people are searching for on the web this week? An informal snapshot of the public mood, from the folks at Google.
  • Guardian (Manchester, UK): Daily British newspaper, funded by a trust, and independent of advertising. George Orwell considered The Guardian to be his most reliable, unbiased source of news. Enough said.
  • Lexis-Nexis: A for-profit site -- as opposed to all the free sites listed here. But incredibly thorough.
  • Media Resource: A non–profit organization that serves as a bridge between science and the media.
  • National Association of Science Writers: The place to be if you have an interest in science writing.
  • National Writers Union: Another important resource for working writers, including material about sample contracts, pay, and rights.
  • Nieman Conference on Narrative Journalism: Sponsored by Harvard’s Nieman Center, this annual 3-day event has consistently held some of the best conferences on journalism.
  • Open Directory: A directory to what's on the web, assembled website–by–website by real human beings, without any advertising or sponsored links. As their logo says, "People do it better."
  • Overseas Press Club of America: Promoting good journalism here and abroad.
  • Phrase Finder: Immediate, free access to the origins and meanings of thousands of phrases, sayings, quips, quotes and cliches of the English language.
  • Profnet: When you're on deadline and need to find an expert fast.
  • SHERP: The home page of my alma mater, New York University's Science Health and Environmental Reporting Program, or SHERP. One of the first of its kind in the United States. I also think it's the best of its kind — but then again, I may be biased.
  • American Australian Association: They have a lively social calendar, with events held at the Australian Consulate in Manhattan. For their get–togethers, they import real Victoria Bitter from Australia — sent by diplomatic pouch. Americans, be forewarned of the potency of this "amber fluid".
  • Australian Slang Dictionary: "Amber fluid," "Oz," "China plate." What do these terms mean? Find out, in this dictionary of Aussie slang. ("Amber fluid" = beer; "Oz" = Australia; "China plate" = mate, or pal.)
  • Centre for the Public Awareness of Science: Devoted to bringing science to the masses, this Australian organization does cool stuff, like truck the contents of the national science museum to isolated places in the outback. And bring along 24, young, energetic scientist/actors to make it all come to life. (Beware: you might find yourself talked into jumping in – as in the time I helped to bring an inflatable planetarium to the Cundeelee Aboriginal Reservation.)
  • Fulbright: The website of the folks who sent me to the land of Oz (Australia.) I highly recommend the work of this organization, along with its sister organization, the Australian–American Fulbright Commission (www.fulbright.com.au)
  • Fulbright Academy of Science and Technology: Less than two–years old, this organization seeks to bring together Fulbright alums with a science bent (as well as non–alums interested in going overseas). A good place to compare notes, hear of interesting international projects, and see how living abroad for an extended period affected people's work/life afterward.
  • Local Times Around the World: The Aussies are travel fanatics, so it's no surprise that this site is based down–under.
  • Lonely Planet: Founded by a couple in Melbourne, this is the home of the ultimate traveler's guides to any place off the beaten trail. Always reliable, always up–to–date, always full of unexpected tips.
  • Lord Howe Island: A world heritage site, a nature sanctuary — and the most beautiful place I've ever been. See my December '04/January '05 National Wildlife Magazine story, "Unlikely Bird of Paradise," in the Portfolio/Magazines section of dandrollette.com
  • Summer Study Abroad: Global Student Experience provides study abroad programs in Australia, Europe, Argentina and the UK.
  • The Australian: Australia's dominant newspaper, you'll find here all the news that Rupert Murdoch finds fit to print.
  • Tim-Tams: Looking for Vegemite? Dying for Tim–Tams, but can't find any in the USA? You can get ‘em all here at the Australian Catalogue Company. Run by two ex–Aussies, this company caters to those homesick for down–under.
  • Upside-down Map: The world as seen from the Aussie perspective, along with other maps created by ODT. You'll never take looking at the world for granted again.
  • Waltzing Matilda: What are the words to Australia's unofficial national anthem, what do they mean, and how did Banjo Patterson come about to write them?
  • Conservation International: One of several organizations doing cutting edge work in Southeast Asia.
  • Endangered Primate Rescue Center: The official website of the wildlife center profiled in my International Wildlife article, which can be seen on the “Portfolio/Magazine” section of www.dandrollette.com.
  • Pete Peterson: Assignment - Hanoi: A link to the transcript of the PBS documentary on Peterson, a former POW who returned to Vietnam to become the first US ambassador since war's end. Amazing man. I interviewed him at his new embassy office in Hanoi – just four miles away from the prison where he was held during the war. He had to pass by his old cell every day on his way to work. Peterson's comment: "The way you win in a situation like that is by surviving, and putting it behind you." Last I heard, Peterson had married a Vietnamese woman — one of the "Boat People" emigres — whom he met at an embassy reception.
  • U.S. Embassy - Hanoi: For the latest news on what's happening.
  • Vietgate: Gateway to one of the largest online Vietnam sites.
  • Vietnam Internet Resources: One of the largest collections of English-language links to Southeast Asia.
  • Adam Penenberg: Adam won national attention for unmasking serial fabricator Stephen Glass of The New Republic. His story is portrayed in the film Shattered Glass.
  • Barry Yeoman: Barry's investigative work is the stuff of legend. But the story I like best is a piece of political commentary: Immediately after naming North Carolina Gov. Jim Martin "the official state vegetable," Martin called a press conference to announce that he was not, in fact, a vegetable
  • Christy Reed: Oceanographer/journalist Christy has been on assignment in the Galapagos, "shipwrecked" on a Scottish island for a reality television show, and worked as science coordinator for James Cameron's IMAX film, "Aliens of the Deep" — in which she went 3,300 feet below the surface of the ocean.
  • Cynthia Barnes: When she's not getting arrested in Tibet or interviewing Billy Bob Thornton, Cynthia writes killer travel tales.
  • Erik Ness: Erik's work has been published in all sorts of environmental magazines, including Discover, Preservation Backpacker, Wisconsin Trails, Grist — and Fit Pregnancy.
  • Jack El-Hai: Jack won kudos for The Lobotomist, a biography and medical thriller that takes readers into a dark chapter of American medicine. And he's got a cool name — so cool that a novelist has taken it for the name of a character.
  • Jonathan Green: Jonathan carries the phrase "participatory journalism" to a whole new level. He began his career "on a north London back street with eight skinheads, ten pints of Guinness and the loss of his front teeth. "
  • Rebecca Skloot: Rebecca's work has appeared everywhere, from Popular Science to the New York Times Magazine. Be sure to read her piece on fish surgery.
  • Robin Mejia: Biologist–turned–science writer Robin Mejia has written everything from CNN documentaries to Wired magazine stories.
  • Sue Russell: Sue wrote the biography Lethal Intent, the inside story of serial killer Aileen Wuornos, who shot seven men to death in Florida — the same incident which became the movie Monster. Be sure to see Sue's piece in New Scientist on the science — or lack thereof — behind the "evidence" for arson.

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A bunch of idiosyncratic, enjoyable, time-wasting, but sometimes useful links.